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Phishing scams on the rise again

Don’t be a victim, be informed! (re-post from April 2, 2012)

Phishing scams in Second Life

There has been an increase in Phishing attempts in the last couple weeks and a lot of people have fallen for them and lost their Second Life Accounts.

Phishing in SL is mainly the act of tricking a user into giving their login and password information through fake yet convincing Second Life login webpages.

Here is how it works. 
– Someone posts a link and sometimes text to entice you to click it, sometimes this can be a friend or someone you know (because they’ve already had their accounts hacked).
– You click the link and it takes you to what looks like a Second Life Login screen.
– You log in using your SL Username and PW.
– You’ve just been Phished and given someone your SL Login information. They can now log into your SL account, take your money, destroy your SL Property, delete your inventory.. etc etc etc.

How to avoid being Phished

If you have clicked a link, and it takes you to a login page of some kind, no matter how much it looks real… DO NOT LOG INTO IT YET!

FIRST, look at the URL very carefully. The real Linden Lab Login URL starts with
https://id.secondlife.com/…..
If it does NOT start with https://id.secondlife.com/, then it is not a real Second Life login web page. Do not log into it, and DO file an abuse report on the person who sent the link. From the Help menu,  Report Abuse.

 

If you are unsure, go to http://secondlife.com and click on the “LOGIN” at the top right. That will take you to the legit login page which starts with https://id.secondlife.com. Log into that page, then follow the link.. if the link still takes you to a log in widget.. it’s totally a scam.

If you’ve already been Phished

Immediately

– Go to http://secondlife.com
– Click the LOGIN link at the top right and enter your login information.
– On the right is a link called “Account” click it!
– Then click “Change Password” and change your password right away.

Please, protect your accounts. Think 3 times before entering your login information. Always check the URL.

Sincerely,

Jessica Lyon and the Phoenix/Firestorm Team

  • should mention that they should check their email address associated with the account as well …. if the person gets into their acct they can change that and then they can reset at will whenever they feel like it

    SD Serenity

    March 2, 2013

  • Thanks for putting this up, I’ve hacked in my past and its surprising how many people fall for this scam… good to know people like you in world ensuring this old trick stays old ;)

    Iscabox Flux

    March 2, 2013

  • Manually going to the site is the way to go for ANY type of link that requires a login to proceed further.
    And even that can be hacked into, but it first needs an infected computer, so careful with those free screensavers or toolbars for the browser.

    Virtualban Alex

    March 3, 2013

  • Believe it or not, even I got caught by this trick about a year ago. I was very busy when a known friend sent me a link telling me I “Need to see this!”, brought me to a very good representation of the linden login screen where I logged in but after logging in it just brought me back to the same screen. Alarm bells rang, I looked at the URL, I said “OH SHI…”. Immediately logged into my dashboard and changed my PW right away, I was safe. Imagine if someone got a hold of my main account in SL, wow.
    But it goes to show even those of us who are very well aware of scams like this can still get caught.

    Jessica Lyon

    March 3, 2013

  • I think second life needs to add account security measure, like steamguard protection.

    Joshua

    March 5, 2013

  • I have no sympathy for those that get “hacked”. I also have zero tolerance for people saying they were “hacked” when they gave away their password as opposed to a group/person using a security loophole to access it.

    MadBiker Wolf

    March 6, 2013

  • I totally agree with you.

    I also don’t have any sympathy for people who ask friends to help them to get their stuff back (without telling their former username!), which is IMO another method of frauding.

    Katie

    March 11, 2013

  • People make mistakes, and when a website looks as concinving, it happens. When your friends get hacked without your knowledge and you go laid back to their given website, it happens. You can’t blame when such things happen, but it happens. Especially people who have no idea websites such as these actually EXIST, they become victimes, and you cannot just shrug this off and call them stupid.

    Matty

    March 13, 2013

  • The word “hacking” has a meaning.
    It actual means to successfully use a thing for tasks it was not made for.
    The most famous “hack” actually a crime! The most famous hack is the bidirectional data exchange over the printer-port which originally has been developed for unidirectional data transfer. This hack even made it to common operating systems like Windows and is well known as “Laplink”.
    What I wanna say is that, to enter your name and password into a fake website voluntary, is definitely not being hacked. It is a fraud, sure, but it is something you can prevent if you allways double-check the Browsers URL. All modern browsers now have URL-highlightning, which means they make it easy to compare if the URL is »secondlife.com« or something else (»secondlife.com« has to be clear black while the rest of the URL is grayed out).
    So, yes it’s sad. Yes, it’s costly to get back the account.
    But it’s also greed when clicking a link to a “free (or cheap) gift”, or using the “sl money hack” as seen in Youtube.

    Katie

    March 16, 2013

  • The word “hacking” has a meaning.
    It actual means to successfully use a thing for tasks it was not made for.
    The most famous “hack” actually wasn’t a crime! The most famous hack is the bidirectional data exchange over the printer-port which originally has been developed for unidirectional data transfer. This hack even made it to common operating systems like Windows and is well known as “Laplink”.
    What I wanna say is that, to enter your name and password into a fake website voluntary, is definitely not being hacked. It is a fraud, sure, but it is something you can prevent if you allways double-check the Browsers URL. All modern browsers now have URL-highlightning, which means they make it easy to compare if the URL is »secondlife.com« or something else (»secondlife.com« has to be clear black while the rest of the URL is grayed out).
    So, yes it’s sad. Yes, it’s costly to get back the account.
    But it’s also greed when clicking a link to a “free (or cheap) gift”, or using the “sl money hack” as seen in Youtube.

    Katie

    March 16, 2013

  • I allow myself to have fun with those phishing scam tries.
    Whenever i land at one of their websites, i put in a sentence broken up into two parts (acc.name/pw). It mostly consists of a very, very demeaning and degrading and insult. *evil grin*

    Paul

    March 9, 2013

  • Why don’t you set up a users’ forum at firestorm.org?

    allex

    March 10, 2013

  • I know of no way of pointing out that (opening my browser), the reference to “Down Syndrom” should be to “Down’s Syndrome”. Doesn’t anyone spell check any more?

    Doc Nolan

    March 19, 2013

  • Communication is 50% grammar/spelling and 50% comprehension, with the grammar/spelling being Party 1’s responsibility and with comprehension being yours.

    If you genuinely struggle to understand what a person is trying to communicate because of how poorly it may be worded or spelled, then that is cause to care about someone’s grammar/spelling.
    If you understood what they are trying to say, and complain anyway, you’re just whining and should probably find something more important to fight for.

    Umbra

    March 21, 2013

  • Actually the technical name for trisomy-21 IS Down syndrome (no “‘s”)

    Theresa Tennyson

    March 25, 2013

  • What if Firestorm gives an extra warning, e.g. “DO NOT ENTER YOUR SL LOGIN DATA TO THE PAGE YOU ABOUT TO VISIT”, if the URL is not accociated to secondlife.com, but contains the phrase “marketplace” or “secondlife.com” (e.g. marketplace.ihackyou.ru or marketplace.secondlife.com.crime.org). You also could color links to secondlife.com in green, and suspect URLs in red or even strike-thru.

    Katie

    March 11, 2013

  • […] is being used and the avi is a member of the group being used to send the phishing links. This webpage is a re-post from April 2, 2012, but the information is still relevant. Be informed and be […]

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